• Housekeeping

    It’s been a week. I’ve learned some things and I’ll be better off for it, but it has been exhausting and not always fun. Some readers have noticed the challenges and sent some kind words of support. For them I am grateful. It really does help!

    If you haven’t noticed or don’t know what I’m talking about, that’s OK. Don’t worry. Nothing terrible happened. Just a hard week blog-wise, on top of life’s usual curve-balls, none of which were, individually, terribly wicked. I’m fine.

    However, what you may begin to notice if you haven’t already is that there are some new folks commenting, and not doing a very skilled job of it. I try to clear out the really bad stuff and long rants (in keeping with the policy) when I can. Over night and when I’m busy, many hours will pass before I can clean house.

    My request to regular readers and commenters is that if you see a rant, an aggressive comment, anything pejorative, just ignore it. I’m all for debate, but some styles of it don’t deserve your time or mine. If it looks ugly, assume I’ll kill it when I can. This is a know-it-when-you-see-it kind of thing and I trust your judgement.

    If a comment is clean, reasonably polite, and not too long, and you wish to address it, go ahead. I don’t care if it is not in agreement with me or my co-bloggers, just that it is not obnoxious. I may or may not address comments myself (mostly not, but I do chime in sometimes). I do read them, and I am very appreciative of the thoughtful information and ideas most of them convey.

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    • Austin, I wouldn’t worry about the rants too much for sure. I would view most of that as a GOOD thing about your increased visibility. If those who weren’t interested in rational debate didn’t dump on you it would mean they weren’t reading you. So this is all a natural part of your progression in this blog.

      I still think the good part of state variation is what it always has been in the US, an opportunity for citizens to mold things to their own context on the state level. If health reform and other big programs did not permit this, they are unlikely to generate what those citizens want. As I always say, Utah is not Massachusetts….

      Jim

      • @Jim – You articulated some of the lessons learned. It’s one thing to know these things (and I did), it’s quite another to experience it directly. Very educational.