• About Aaron

    Portraits1832FinalCroppedAaron E. Carroll, MD, MS is a Professor of Pediatrics and Associate Dean for Research Mentoring at Indiana University School of Medicine. He is also the director of the Center for Health Policy and Professionalism Research. He earned a BA in chemistry from Amherst College, an MD from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and an MS in health services from the University of Washington, where he was also a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar.

    Aaron’s research focuses on the study of information technology to improve pediatric care and areas of health policy including physician malpractice, the pharmaceutical industry/physician relationship, and health care financing reform. He is also the co-author of Don’t Swallow Your Gum: Myths, Half-Truths, and Outright Lies About Your Body and Health, Don’t Cross Your Eyes…They’ll Get Stuck That Way!: And 75 Other Health Myths Debunked, and Don’t Put That in There!: And 69 Other Sex Myths Debunked, all published by St.Martin’s Press. In addition to being a regular contributor to The Upshot at The New York Times, he has written for CNN.com, Bloomberg News, the JAMA Forum, and The Wall Street Journal. He has appeared on Good Morning America, the CBS Evening News, ABC News Now, and The Colbert Report. He’s a regular guest (usually on Monday at 9:30 AM) on Stand Up! with Pete Dominick, which airs on Sirius/XM radio.

    He also has a popular YouTube channel called Healthcare Triage, where he talks about health research and health policy. Go check it out!

    You are welcome to “friend” Aaron on Facebook or follow him on Twitter, where he talks about a lot more than health policy.  You can also email him.

    (The views in Aaron’s posts represent his views only.  They do not represent  the views of Indiana University, any funding agencies or foundations,  any organizations, or especially any of his friends or family.)

    For speaking inquiries, contact Jo at Speakers on Healthcare or 800.697.7325

    Speaking of which, in the interest of full disclosure, I do give talks to various groups across the country about health care policy, health care reform, information technology, and medical myths. If I am ever writing a post about a product or issue that directly involves one of these groups, I will say so in that post. I declare all potential conflicts of interest to Indiana University. I also declare any that fall under ICJME guidelines to journals. The only potential conflict of interest that meets the latter criteria at this time is that in June, 2015, I was asked to give a talk at Upsher-Smith Laboratories on the US health care system and health care reform. For this, I was paid an honorarium and travel expenses. The company had no control over the content. I did not speak about pharma products, drugs, or clinical conditions. I have no further relationship with the company.

    I also declare any other potential conflicts in my posts. These are times when I’m doing funded research in the areas I’m writing about, when I personally know an author of a paper I’m writing about, or when any other academic or ideological conflict exists. To be honest, I think those are often far more important than financial conflicts of interest, and that we ignore them at our peril.